lamy pens are cool
Stories

Lamy Pens Are Cool

lamy pens are cool

The appreciation of a fountain pen gift - by Ivo and Delilah

We have many friendly and loyal customers, and amongst them is one customer down in Bristol. John is something of a pen enthusiast and he has been a regular customer and communicator with Mishka and Jo.

He recently bought Lamy Safari fountain pens for his grandchildren. They were so happy with their new pens that they wrote a thank you letter. To say thank you. And of course, they wrote their letters with the very same fountain pens.

John was so taken with this that he shared it with us, and said we could share it with you. So thank you Ivo and Delilah (and John) for sharing your love of Lamy pens.

Thank You letter from Ivo, aged 7
Thank You letter from Ivo, aged 7
Thank You letter from Delilah, aged 10
Thank You letter from Delilah, aged 10

It’s always wonderful to see the younger generation pickup a pen instead of spending their days flicking through endless distractions provided these days on a tablet.

At the end of the day it’s up to all of us to inspire the next age of humanity to keep on writing, thank you John for your little bit to keep it going!

our man in parliament
Stories

What People Do All Day – Our Man In Parliament

our man in parliament - stationery reviews on the inside

Stationery reviews from inside the house

This post was written by Richard

Inspired perhaps by Richard Scarry’s “What do people do all day?” and the adventures of Farmer Alfalfa, Stiches the Tailor and Grocer Cat, our good friends at Bureau asked me to write a short piece about what I do all day. I can only imagine that this is the beginning of a soon to be much anticipated occasional blogpost about the goings-on—stationery related or otherwise—of the cast of thousands who call themselves Bureau’s happy customers.

My remit, such as it was, was to paint a brief but fascinating picture of my working day and to talk a little about where stationery fits into that. So…what do I do all day? Well, I work in Parliament. There are many, many things to enjoy about working there—the staff, the riverside location, the history—but, oddly, the thing I enjoy the most is the tourists. Sure, getting through the door in the morning can feel like facing off against the New England Patriots, but it’s buzzy and people are enjoying themselves just being there. Which is nice.

And what do I do once I actually get into the building? Well, all that talking, all that arguing, all that shouting you see on television—and all that sensible discussion you probably don’t see on television— gets written down somewhere. By someone. And that someone is me and my colleagues. We sit in on debates. We make sure all that talking gets recorded. And we make sure it all gets written up and checked. Throughout it all, we come and go quietly, trying not to draw attention to ourselves. In fact, one chairwoman even joked we were a bit like MI5—“only better.” High praise indeed. Perhaps it could be our motto.

lamy aion fountain pen

Finally, I said this blog was about stationery, and so it is. I do a lot of writing at work, and I use a lot of stationery. Mostly, I use a Lamy Aion fountain pen with a beautiful turquoise Pilot Iroshizuku ink and an extra fine nib. Partly, I like the Aion’s unusual brushed black aluminium finish; partly, I like its impressive bulk. Oddly, though, the Aion’s not a heavy pen; quite the opposite. Its aluminium body makes it surprisingly light and easy to hold. And it’s well balanced, so it rests comfortably in my hand. The ink flow is great, too, which is really important, because I do a lot of writing under pressure.

pilot iroshizuku ama iro turquoise ink
Iroshiuzuku Ama-Iro ink
viking rollo a4 dot grid pad
Viking Rollo Dot-Grid Pad

I also use a Viking Rollo dotpad. The whole design shows an incredible attention to detail. The cover is beautifully minimal, the dots are subtle and unobtrusive, and sheets are really easy to detach. Most important of all, however, the paper is incredibly smooth.  Combined with the Aion and the Iroshizuku ink, it makes for a really lovely writing experience.

So, there you have it: my day. Perhaps less energetic than Farmer Alfalfa’s, but petty fun all the same—and with better stationery.

Review

Review – Monteverde Monza fountain pen

Monteverde Monza pen and ink

Introduction

Monteverde Monza fountain pens come in a box with 2 cartridges and a converter. Sleeve on the box explains the filling instructions which is a nice touch (not many pen makers do this).

Transparent pens are really popular at the moment and Monteverde offers Monza in 4 colours : Crystal Clear, Island Blue, Honey Amber and Grey Sky.

Monteverde Monza colour family

I’m wondering if the pen can also be eye dropped – body is made of plastic and there is an o-ring which will help to seal ink chamber – if any one has tried it, let us know…

There are 2 nib choices – fine and medium. Mine is a fine and it writes similarly to Lamy/Kaweco EF steel nibs.

One of the coolest features of this pen is  transparent feed which will display the ink nicely. Ink on the photo below is J. Herbin – Lie de The #matchymatchy 🙂

Monteverde Monza transparent feed

Performance

Here is where Monza pen gets interesting – Monteverde advertises these as flexible nibs…we haven’t had a flexible pen before, so I jumped right in to give it a go…

BTW there is no need to use it as flex, it can be used as everyday pen too.

Get some good paper – there will be a lot of ink on the page, so make sure your paper can handle it 🙂 If you have an ink problem like I do, then this will help run it down a little 🙂 This kind of heavy ink usage has its benefits – it shows off shading, have a look at the pictures 🙂

The basic principle of flexing the nib is to press down on the downstrokes and use lighter pressure on the upstroke to create line variation. You could always just practice strokes first – after all modern or any calligraphy letterforms are constructed from a series of individual strokes. Some handwriting styles work better with flex, especially joined-up writing.

In conclusion

£15* for a pen with flexible nib – what to expect…

It’s not a true flex, but you can achieve some line variation out of it (more than you would from a standard for example Lamy nib…)

For true flex nib you would have to go vintage (expensive) or a dip pen (really scratchy, needs dipping a lot), so this is a good way to try and see if it’s something you might like to invest in.

Monteverde Monza is a lot of fun. Experiment, slow down, be mindful when writing, explore the flex possibilities – I will continue to use this pen to test inks and play with modern cursive writing.

*price was correct at the time of posting this article

A little HINT – see how many swirls you can do before the feed starts running out of ink (this is completely normal). I got good few flexes out of it 🙂

A big HINT – if you are going to use flex a lot then priming the feed will be necessary – simply turn converter and push some air out and let ink saturate the feed (have some tissues ready just in case) and you will be good to go again.

lamy aion fountain pen review
Review

Review – Lamy Aion Fountain Pen

lamy aion fountain pen review

Introduction

Lamy’s penchant for Bauhaus and industrial design hardly needs a mention, and the Lamy Aion line of pens is the latest evolution in a lineage of exactly that style that was started by the Lamy 2000 over fifty years ago. In collaboration with industrial designer Jasper Morrison, the Aion is a modern if familiar addition to the Lamy pen range.

Style

Personally, I’m a huge fan of minimalist and industrial design; give me smooth lines, robust materials, and say more with less – and from the first reveal the Aion was a perfect match. The raw aluminium is drawn from a die rather than machined, and curves gracefully towards the end of the barrel and top of the cap, with a brushed texture that goes against the flow of the pen rather than with it.

A polished cap ring and clip accent the pen without taking the spotlight off of the aluminium barrel. In my opinion the Silverolive (though I’ve yet to find the ‘olive’ part) works much better with the design than the black anodised version, and I can only imagine what an all-black version would have looked like with matching black clip. This isn’t to say the black version is bad, it wouldn’t look out of place in a boardroom or a CEO’s desk, just that the silver version just seems to represent the design a bit better.

Score: 10/10

Features

Not much to comment on here – the ballpoint is the usual twist mechanism, and the rollerball is a rollerball – cap, barrel, M63 refill, done. The caps of the rollerball and fountain pen feature a spring-loaded clip and post snugly,  but I’ve found the pen much more comfortable in size and balance without the cap. On the fountain pen is a brand new nib that just oozes style with its curvier design, and you’ll be pleased to read that it’s an excellent writer too – more on that in a bit.

Disappointingly, the fountain pen doesn’t ship with an included Z27 converter. Considering much cheaper pens such as the Logo come with one as standard, this ends up being a puzzling decision by Lamy.

Score: 8/10

lamy aion fountain pen review

Usability

Subjective opinions on look aside, one thing everyone in the office seems to agree on is that the new Z53 nib is a brilliant refinement of the classic Z50. Lamy calls it “expressive”, and I’m tempted to say that it isn’t just marketing hyperbole. I opted for the extra fine version and my first experience with it was surprising – using a wet ink (KWZ Midnight Green), the line was not quite what you might expect of an extra fine nib with a line that seemed much thicker than it ought to be.

With a dryer ink the line was a lot closer to what you’d expect. This might be an annoyance for some and understandably so, but I’d like to wager all would be forgiven once you feel just how amazingly smooth this nib is. No hypodermic needles here, the Z53 glides across the page – and I’ve tried it on almost every paper we have here, from Tomoe River paper to good old copier paper. Lamy’s Z50 steel nibs have never really been considered bad, but these new nibs are in another class – I’ve yet to experience any burping, dry starts, or skipping.

And while the nib is smooth as butter, thankfully the same can’t be said for aluminium grip. Though it looks deceptively non-grippy, the abrasive-blasted section is more than comfortable to write with, and I’ve not once had to readjust my grip.

Score: 9/10

Value for money

At just shy of £48* for the fountain pen and rollerball, and £39* for the ballpoint, the Aion is firmly priced in the mid-range of Lamy’s pens – cheaper than the Accent AL and Studio, but considerably more than the AL-Star and Safari’s, and honestly I feel it’s a fairly priced pen. A modern design with a robust construction is paired with a fantastic nib. However, the lack of a bundled converter is a glaring hole and definitely worth bearing in mind if you’re not content with the selection of colours available in Lamy’s T10 cartridges.

Additionally, the Z53 nibs are fully compatible with Lamy’s other fountain pens (Lamy 2000 excluded), so you’re well within your right to grab a stand-alone nib and swapping it out on a Safari or AL-Star. But if you don’t own a Lamy pen already (or even if you do!), the Aion is a fantastic pen if you’re looking to spend a little more for a premium feel.

* Prices correct at time of publishing!

Score: 9/10

Verdict

The Aion is a brilliant addition to Lamy’s range, and while it might be considered safe and unremarkable by some, I say it is more than worthy to follow the path laid down by the Lamy 2000 fountain pen and one of Lamy’s best collaborations yet. Lack of a bundled converter knocks some points off the final score, but overall I struggled to find much of anything to fault, especially when the nib and pen compliment each other to provide such a fantastic writing experience.

Style
Features
Usability
Value for money
upgrade my fountain pen
Q&A

Q&A: Why should I upgrade my fountain pen?

upgrade my fountain pen

Our guide to spending a little bit more on a fountain pen

Introduction

So you are considering upgrading your fountain pen for a smarter, more expensive model. But what will you get for your money? You have maybe dipped your toe in the water and bought your first fountain pen. Now persuaded of the joys of using a fountain pen, your thoughts have turned to where you go next.

So having let your mind wander to what other pens are out there and what spending a little bit more might get you, this article is an attempt at giving some basic advice in terms of what to look for when moving from an entry-level pen to a mid-range pen.

What is an entry level pen?

lamy safari fountain pen

Typically most people will start here. This is most likely because of cost. A first pen might come in around £15-20 and even that can be a big investment when you are making the step up from say a ballpoint pen (dare I suggest you made the leap from a Bic biro to fountain pen?).

That is not to say that an entry level pen is not one that won’t last you a lifetime. Typically these pens might be something like the Lamy Safari fountain pen, the Kaweco Skyline, or maybe even a TWSBI Eco or the Pilot MR (aka the Pilot Metropolitan). All come in at under £30, some for under £20. All are great pens and will serve you well for many a year. But if you do want more…

What is a mid-range pen?

lamy aion fountain pen

For the purposes of this article, a mid-range fountain pen has been defined as being one that costs over and above an entry-level, but not into the eye-watering levels that you can pay. So this has been set at a more modest level of between £40 and £75.

Also, since entry-level will vary from brand to brand, it is deemed to be pens that display elements of being an upgrade on a more basic pen.

Key reasons to upgrade

So why upgrade? Well it becomes ever harder to actually justify the step up purely on value for money. There are gains to be had by spending more, certainly, but it is also an emotional decision and there is no point skirting round this. Nevertheless there are some clear benefits to be had from spending a bit more.

Material

Whilst your entry-level pen will typically be made of plastic, you would certainly expect your mid-range pen to be made of a superior material. More often that not this will be metal, likely aluminium as it is lightweight and perfect for a pen. It makes for a more solid, durable pen than plastic, yet you will not be adding any serious weight to the pen. In fact the slight extra weight might make the pen better as it adds just enough to make it feel substantial without being heavy.

You may also find that this extends to all elements of the pen – look for what the clip and grip sections are made from.

Tip – consider what material you would feel comfortable writing with, and what weight of pen would suit you, and check the full specification.

Nib

This is something that will vary from pen to pen, and a lot of mid-range pens will not necessarily have a better nib that your entry-level pen. For example many Lamy pens have the same Z50 nib, from the Safari and ABC through to a Scala or Accent. Others like the Aion do have a better nib, in this case the new Z53 nib. It is more likely that the extra cost of the pen will get you a better barrel than a better nib but it is worth checking.

Also, a more expensive pen may actually have access to a better range of nib sizes although this again will depend on each manufacturer.

Tip – how important would a better nib be at this stage? This may require you pushing your budget even further.

Features

This will vary from pen to pen but a more expensive pen might come with a few extra features or add-ons. Certainly most Lamy pens above a certain value will come with a converter. Other entry-level pens may not come with a gift box (worth considering if it is a gift for someone).

Tip – consider all aspects of what you want from your pen – don’t just be seduced by the look!

Design

The design of the pen is where there will be marginal gains in making the pen better – possibly a better grip section, or the way the cap can be posted or the way the clip works. Small improvements but it can make a real difference especially with a pen, which requires a good connection between hand and pen.

Tip – consider what you like the least about your current pen and in what ways it could be improved. Then consider your ‘new’ pen in light of this.

Style

This is where the choice becomes more emotional. Typically a more expensive pen will be better designed, and may even have been designed by a well-known product designer. This might not make it a better at writing, but owning a pen that you love might make a difference. A pen you want to write with because it looks good is a pen you will enjoy writing with all the more.

Tip – this all comes down to personal preference. Only you know what you like.

Other tips

If you are still unsure then read a few reviews. Think about what you don’t like with your current pen and consider whether a new pen will answer some or all of these problems. And if still unsure then see if you can try out the pen in person. We do offer a try before you buy service with pens but please do check with us first as we can’t offer this on all pens.

Grey is the new black
Ideas

Grey is the new black

Grey is the new black

Grey stationery

Grey is a colour that doesn’t get on a popular radar very often, it really is the new Diamine Earl Grey ink which started it all 🙂 Then the new grey washi tape arrived followed shortly by grey Age Bag notebooks – coincidence? Hmmm… We love playing with all stationery, so Dominic went on treasure hunt around the warehouse and collected everything in grey. I helped with inks (of course) in another blog post. You can read about 10 different greys here.

Age Bag Grey notebooks
Opera Pebble envelopes
left handed fountain pen nib
Q&A

Q&A: What Is A Left-Handed Fountain Pen?

Lamy Z50 left handed fountain pen nib

How well suited are pens to left-handed people?

We are often asked about pens for left-handers, specifically left-handed fountain pens. Given that a lot of people are left-handed this market is poorly catered for. Apart from those designed for young children, there is not much available.

Although some 10% of the population are left-handed, as a child I was the only one in a class of 39 pupils apart from my teacher. She, being a no-nonsense type, was determined that if she could write ‘properly’ so could I. Properly meant ensuring my writing sloped to the right and not backwards and she would return all my left-sloping efforts to me with a big red ‘NO’ all over them. After being kept in for seemingly endless lunchtimes being made to write out over and over the handwriting cards we used, she declared herself reasonably satisfied. My writing was and still is, forward sloping.

left handed writing with a fountain pen
Left-handed writing that avoids smudging the ink (it's a Caran d'Ache 849 fluorescent orange fountain pen, nail varnish model's own)

These days children are allowed to develop their own style and backward sloping writing is considered fine. The problem many left-handers have though is that they find it difficult to see what they have written as they are going over the text as they move forward This then leads to the curled hand or hook many people end up developing to avoid smudging. The answer is to try and learn to hold the pen under the writing so that you can still see. The grip should be well back from the end of the pen so as to keep the hand back and the wrist should be straight. Turning the paper by 45 degrees clockwise makes it easier to slant the writing forwards if that is preferred.

But what of specialist pens? Many pens have a universal grip but with fountain pens there is the question of the nib. Of the brands we sell, only Lamy offers a left-handed fountain pen nib. Opinion is divided on how useful this is with some feeling there is no real difference between an LH nib and a medium. When I have tested them out I can feel no difference but that may be because of my writing style which is more akin to a right-hander (thanks Miss) but others may find differently. One of the issues to consider is that the left-handed nib only comes in medium so if you want a fine or broad, tough, they don’t make them for left-handers. Italic nibs can be difficult for those with overhand styles as contact with the paper can be lost with some angles but again, all these things depend on the writing style.

Certainly for children there can be an advantage of offering a left-handed nib. Even if the difference is slight or non-existent, the child may feel they have a special writing instrument that will help them and sometimes small things make a difference. Arguably fountain pens in themselves can help as they require careful positioning which encourages a proper grip and of course they are a bit special. For adults though it is a harder choice. Ultimately, if you are happy with a medium nib then it may be worth trying the left-handed version to see if that feels comfortable. If you want a fine or broad though, give it a go and you may be surprised to find it works just fine. If not, you’ll have to come see me at lunchtime I guess.

new lamy aion due soon
Films

News: The New Lamy Aion Is Coming

new lamy aion pen

The New Lamy Aion - Due Autumn 2017

The new Lamy Aion is due out later this year and looks quite exciting. A brand new pen, designed by Jasper Morrison, and with a completely new nib which intself is an exciting development since almost all other pens use the standard Lamy Z50 nib. Available in fountain pen – with extra fine, fine, medium and broad nibs, as well as ballpoint and rollerball versions. All are availabe in a silver or black metal finish.

More news when we have it!

the journal shop stand
Stories

London Stationery Show 2017

the journal shop stand

The London stationery show has been a staple of the Bureau calendar for many a year now.

It’s situated in the functional Business Design Centre where once a year, stationery geeks gather to share the best and newest in the biz. This event also coincides with National Stationery Week which quite simply celebrates what we all love – stationery 🙂 #natstatweek

It is a trade show so unfortunately not open to the public. So Mishka, Emma and Faisal were tasked with being your eyes and ears 🙂 Here is what they have to report.

business design centre

Our expectations

We all had differing expectations. Mishka now has two Stationery Shows under her belt, Faisal’s second time out and rookie on the block Emma.

Mishka: Half of our team visited on Tuesday, me and Faisal went on Wednesday. This was my 3rd show in a row, so I knew what to expect – lots of amazing stationery! 🙂 I knew time would be tight so I did my homework. Carefully clicking through all the exhibitors (100+), I made a list of stands I wanted to visit and products I wanted to see.

Some things never change – it is the same beautiful venue. This year there were a lot of workshops – I was particularly interested in trying Calligraphy. #writingmatters

Faisal: To be quite frank, I was feeling a little down on going to the London Stationery Show this year. I remembered enjoying my first time out to the show last year but would it be any different this time around? How much could really change over the course of the year? These doubts had begun to brew, possibly unfairly, as I am surrounded by the same old stuff on my desk.

With this mindset, I hadn’t actually planned to go around and explore the show floor too much, thinking there wouldn’t really be much new to see anyway. I settled on killing my time with a safe looking programme of seminars and workshops that would be running throughout the day.

Emma: I only joined Bureau Direct late last year, so this was my first London Stationery Show. I have been to trade shows before, but I have always wanted to go to a stationery trade show! Having heard all about it from the rest of the team, I was really excited to be getting a first look at some new products, meeting with some of my clients, and generally geeking out over lots of lovely pens and paper goods!

2017

National Stationery Show 2017 - hall

2016

london stationery show at the business design centre

2015

National Stationery Show

First Impressions

Emma: I have been to the Business Design Centre in Islington before; its a lovely venue with lots of natural light, and not too big.  I confidently told the rest of the team I would visit the show in the morning, and be back after lunch (needless to say, that didn’t happen. What was I thinking?!). When you first enter the venue, there is a smallish floor space at ground floor level, and then steps behind leading up to a central mezzanine where the bulk of the exhibitors were.  There were also additional exhibitors on the balconies surrounding the hall. Immediately, my eye was drawn to a central New Product Showcase display, with lots of new launches, and from there on in I tried to work my way up and down the aisles is a logical way, without being too distracted!

Mishka: Me and Faisal were in on the Wednesday, as soon as we entered we were met with the display of stationery award winners which were whittled down from the same stand a day earlier. There was a spectacular range of colour this year – lucky cat pencil pot immediately caught my eye. I love everything teal/mint, so I was glad to see #everythingteal

Faisal: Lucky for me then that the Stationery Gods (and Mishka) had other arrangements to my earlier pessimism. Walking through the open doors, you start to feel an extra bounce to your step with your eyes wide and ears pricked. We both took a deep breath and a good whiff of the scent of freshly opened stationery in the air. There’s no turning back once you’ve opened this Pandora’s box. Everything looked fresh and new but I felt right at home, ready to explore!

calligraphy workshop

Calligraphy workshop

Emma: I had wanted to go to the show on the first (Tuesday) morning, because there was a Modern Calligraphy workshop being held by Manuscript pens and Joyce Lee of Artsynibs. Its a tall order trying to teach a mixed ability group in the middle of a trade show, in 30 mins, but Joyce was incredibly patient (and fun!), teaching us to sit in the right position, hold the dip pens the right way, and most importantly, relax, and BREATHE.  We each came away with a couple of practice sheets and the basics with which to start practising; seeing examples of Joyce’s beautiful calligraphy has certainly inspired me.

Faisal: Having only amateurishly attempted calligraphy for a few minutes, a couple of months ago, hastily on some scraps of paper… this was a brilliant chance to get an initial step up to the table.

The one big thing I took away from that day was the posture. To help keep your writing steady you need a solid position for your arm on the table. Achieving this means angling your chair into the desk so your elbow has a good position on the table. I would have never in my life ever conceived this simple step would instantly improve all my strokes!

Mishka: I can proudly announce that by 10:35 our clean fingers were already splattered in ink 🙂 Joyce is an amazing artist and great teacher. Slowing down and being mindful about every stroke is what makes calligraphy almost zen like. I’d love to just sit there and play with flex dip pens all day… We were discussing printing paper templates at the table – you know you are in the good company when gsm comes up 🙂

Bureau’s Best Bits

Mishka: Paper Republic Grand Voyageur – notebook with leather cover. Similar to Traveler’s notebook which is incredibly trendy at the moment. Packaging, colours (green with red), presentation, sizes and functionality. Everything about this product presses all my stationery buttons…

The most fun stationery of the show award goes to the magnetic Polar pen. We probably spent an hour making shapes and launching magnets in the air and we continue to do so even as I write this 🙂 Andrew, the creator of the pen is a true inventor with plenty of ideas up his sleeve. I really hope to see his creations doing well…

I was eager to try out the Pentel Hybrid gel pens which Emma told me about the day before. These gels are rather magical. Believe it or not, but they look differently on white and black paper. Green turns into blue, black into red etc – whaaat?! Amazing! Imagine Emerald of Chivor ink in a gel pen 🙂 I salute you Pentel…Year in and year out you come up with new ideas, really well done!

Paper Republic - Leather!

Paper Republic stand leather covers

POLAR pens - Magnets!

polar pen magnet fun

Emma: Stabilo Boss Pastel Highlighters. They looked so pretty in the display, and gorgeously photogenic. I have a set of four, but now I realise there are actually six in the range. Two more for my shopping list…

The Karlbox. A collaboration between fashion legend Karl Lagerfeld and Faber-Castell, this is the ultimate art set. West Design had a box on display at the show, and I couldn’t help but drool a little over it. Designed like a lacquer jewellery box, each drawer is organised by colour with pencils, markers, pastels and art pens – the entire rainbow. It has a limited production run, and retails at least £2000, but its oh so covetable!

Getting to make my own pen on the Kaweco stand!  I got to choose a cap, grip section, barrel and fit them together. A couple of satisfying ‘clunks’ from their hand-operated machines, hey presto! My very own Kaweco Skyline was born.

Stabilo Boss Pastel

Stabilo Boss Pastel highlighters

The Karlbox

Faber-Castell The KarlBox

Faisal: As a veteran of one previous show so far this was also a must do event for me. Last year we had a whole plastic barrel of fun with the Studio Pen team and had an awesome collage of how we made them. This year me and Mishka wanted to step up our game and bring you a live demonstration! It was all going so well, we got the camera rolling and the machine clunking away.

It’s hard to pick my favourite but I will go out and say I had the most fun with the Polar magnet pen. Even though it will be rarely used to write with, it’s was just an absolute joy to have and play with! Perfect for a quick stress relieving break in the office.

Special mention

Mishka: The best writer of the show goes to Manuscript 1856 pen.
This was on my ‘must see’ list after browsing online the night before. Manuscript hosted the Calligraphy event in the morning so as soon I waved goodbye to Joyce it took all my strength to stick to my planned route instead of running straight to their stand.

Let me tell you…It was love at the first sight. Each pen is turned by hand. The materials look spectacular. They have a choice for everyone, starting with a professional pocket percher in black. I was a bit dismissive of the beige but looking at it closely I saw the subtle elegance of the material, showing up like the calm looking surface of Saturn. The real stars of the show were the pearlescent and swirly type acrylics. Purple and turquoise finishes for the chic and red and orange for the brave.

I ran home with one in my bag, eager to ink it up and boy oh boy… Smooth like butter. Steel nibs can be as smooth as gold and this pen is exactly that. Big win in my book 🙂

Manuscript 1856 fountain pen
Manuscript 1856 fountain pen

In conclusion

Mishka: I’m so glad that I could go to the show – my creative juices and love for stationery have been refuelled 🙂 Big thanks to the organizers, we had a great show!

Emma: The show was everything I expected, and more.  I ended up spending the whole day there, catching up with some of my contacts at Castelli, Moleskine and Caran d’Ache/Faber-Castell, playing with new products, and looking for stationery items that can be branded for our corporate clients.

Faisal: I was happily swayed by the end of the day, the Stationery show was great. These sorts of events just give you a breath of fresh air and sometimes that’s all you need. Actually, I wish I had more time to peruse the stalls. Unlike my colleagues I don’t think I even got around to seeing half of the stands really. Perhaps a bit too much time playing with magnets… 🙂

Faisal, Mishka and Emma

ps: we will see you again next year 🙂

polarpen smiley magnets
Lamy Safari Petrol fountain pen and ink
News

Lamy Safari Petrol – 2017 Special Edition

Hi folks,

It’s here, it’s here!!! Lamy Safari Petrol is here!

Fountain pens come with black Fine or Medium nib (feel free to add any Z50/Z52 nibs of course). They have matt finish, just like Dark Lilac pens.

There are Roller-balls and Ball-point pens too. Ink comes in T10 cartridges and T52 bottles. Don’t forget to add a Z28 converter if you are getting a bottled version.

Petrol colour is gorgeous murky, dark teal-green B) similar to Sailor Miruai. It shows a slight sheen on Tomoe River paper. It’s mature, subtle, perfect everyday ink <3

BTW if you wonder about shipping cost – we use Royal Mail Airmail service for orders outside UK and you can check the cost in the shopping basket before you place the order.

Enjoy!

Lamy Safari Petrol fountain pen and ink
Lamy Safari Petrol fountain pen and ink